Successful Reality Show Ideas-Bad Girls Club

There is a wide variety of different types of reality television shows out there.  There are dating shows, makeover shows, home remodeling shows, ones that follow the lives of celebrities and more.  But one thing that every popular reality TV show has in common is that they all began as just an idea. 

Bad Girls Club is about a changing cast of seven women with different backgrounds and personalities, who have a number of behavioral and psychological problems. They are brought onto the show to change their behaviors and accomplish specific goals while enjoying a fine mansion for three months. They must obey specified rules while their lives in and out of the house are recorded by the production team. Each season features different women, and one of the primary rules of the program is that if a “bad girl” breaks a rule, she is evicted from the show, and depending on how far along the season has progressed, may be replaced by a new cast member. The women are aged 21 to 29; throughout the show the cast members must adapt to the frequent mood changes and behaviors of their housemates as well as obeying rules that they receive before arrival. The cast members are allowed to contact friends and family using a computer connected to a large-screen television, but the use of other televisions or cell phones in the house is prohibited. The show follows the women as they form cliques, book parties in night clubs, and shop for groceries while they attempt to maintain their personal lives. The cliques formed in the season often result in bullying or “tag teaming” other cast members; the stress results in girls leaving the show due to problems with other cast members, as well as for problems at home or court proceedings. In season one, as well as seasons five, six, eight, and nine, multiple participants left.

It was created by Jonathan Murray, who created the Bunim/Murray Productions Company with Mary-Ellis Bunim shortly after developing what is largely considered the original reality television show, The Real World. Murray was born in Gulfport, Mississippi and earned a degree from the University Of Missouri School Of Journalism. Murray and Bunim were inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 2012, after years of creating and producing original reality television programming. Murray has acted as executive producer on popular programs such as Keeping Up with the Kardashians, and The Simple Life.

The format of the first season of Bad Girls Club varies from that of subsequent seasons. The original age range was 21-31 and the use of nicknames was not introduced until two seasons later. In season two, the cast were given mandatory non-profit jobs to help them build a work ethic and understand what it means to be interdependent; quitting the job or failure to attend would result in mandatory removal from the show. The subsequent seasons did not include this requirement. After season 2, the episodes lengthened from 30 minutes to an hour.

If you have a reality show idea of your own, New Show Studios can help you take action and pursue it.  The company has a unique method of creating show concept packages that give network and movie studio executives a professional quality view of your idea.  They can take your reality show idea, develop and package it into a demonstration video and send it off to producers and executives in the entertainment industry. 

Anyone can make a reality TV show concept presentation package with New Show Studios.  You do not need special credentials, background or a college degree to pursue an idea.  As long as you have a clear idea of what your basic idea is and you are able to verbalize this, New Show Studios is happy to help.

Remember that even with the best presentation materials new entertainment development is high risk and there is very little likelihood that your idea will be successfully licensed or result in profit to you.

If you have an idea for a new TV show, movie, or webisode, click here to submit your idea.

Great TV Shows From The 1980s

The Nielsen Company began compiling ratings for television beginning in 1950; prior to that year, ratings were compiled by several other sources. C.E. Hooper, which was bought by Nielsen in February 1950, and Variety, were two of the ratings compilers previously. Nielsen ratings are considered one of if not the prime marker of a TV show’s success; shows are generally canceled if their ratings fail with now sign of improving, or if they do not generate sufficiently high ratings in their first season.

The most popular shows of a particular decade can be a valuable tool for the aspiring television writer; understanding what shows have done to draw viewers in can give ideas for new scripts. If you are interested in developing a new television show, consider studying some of these programs from the 1980s.

The TV show Dallas was a pop culture phenomenon, even though it only held the top ratings for two seasons in the 1980s. The prime time soap opera revolved around the Ewings, a wealthy Texas family in the oil and cattle-ranching industries, and became famous for its cliffhangers. The program was one of the longest lasting full-hour primetime dramas in American TV history, with 357 episodes over 14 seasons. The show was so popular in fact that it inspired a continuation in 2012. The new series focuses on the Ewing sons more than on the father, but the emphasis on greed and wealth has pervaded the new series. The original series began in 1978, but once it hit its stride in the 1980 season, it remained popular; the cliffhangers, including the “Who shot J.R.?” mystery, have become catchphrases among the generation that watched the series. The 1980 episode “Who Done It” remains the second highest rated prime-time telecast ever. The show spawned a spinoff called Knots Landing which also ran for 14 seasons, though without the same level of popularity as Dallas.

While Dallas may have started out the decade on the top, the big winner in terms of ratings for the 80s was The Cosby Show. Almost from its beginning in 1984, The Cosby Show achieved top ratings on the Nielsen ranking system; from the second season in 1985 until 1990, the sitcom held onto its position as the most popular show on television. According to TV Guide, the show “almost single-handedly revived the sitcom genre and NBC’s ratings fortunes.” The series was based on comedy routines from Cosby’s standup act, which in turn were based on his family life. The show centers on the Huxtable family, an affluent African-American family living in Brooklyn Heights, New York. The patriarch, Heathcliff “Cliff” Huxtable, is an obstetrician, with his wife, Clair Huxtable, an attorney. The family is rounded out by five children, four daughters and one son: Sondra, Denise, Theodore, Vanessa, and Rudy. In spite of its comedic tone, the show also approached series subjects, such as dyslexia, teen pregnancy, and other issues. The success of the show inspired more programs with predominantly African-American casts, including In Living Color and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. The show won several Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Comedy Series, Outstanding Writing, and Outstanding Directing. In addition, the show won three Golden Globe Awards, one for Best TV Series-Comedy, and Best Actor in a TV Series, which went to Bill Cosby twice.

There was one show that, at the end of the 1980s, shook The Cosby Show’s ratings; Roseanne shared the distinction of most popular show for the 1989-1990 season. Roseanne debuted in October 1988; the show starred Roseanne Barr and revolved around the Conners, an Illinois working class family. While the show did not hit the number one spot after the 1989-1990 season, it remained in the top four for six of its nine seasons, and in the top twenty for eight seasons. The series’ humor was often crude by television standards and featured provocative subjects such as poverty, alcoholism, drug abuse, birth control, teen pregnancy, masturbation, obesity, race, social class, infidelity and gay rights. The show was also a significant portrayal of feminist ideals, portraying a female-dominated household, a female lead whose likability did not rely on her appearance and relationships between female characters that were cooperative rather than competitive.

Anyone can make a reality TV show concept presentation package with New Show Studios.  You do not need special credentials, background or a college degree to pursue an idea.  As long as you have a clear idea of what your basic idea is and you are able to verbalize this, New Show Studios is happy to help. They can take your reality show idea, develop and package it into a demonstration video and send it off to producers and executives in the entertainment industry. 

Remember that even with the best presentation materials new entertainment development is high risk and there is very little likelihood that your idea will be successfully licensed or result in profit to you.

Anyone Can Be a TV Writer- Jim Henson

The people who have worked to become a successful TV writer come from many different places and backgrounds.  Many did not even work in the entertainment industry- they were just everyday people with an idea.  Most successful TV writers started at the bottom, worked odd jobs at some point, and overcame some sort of obstacle or hardship to get where they are today.

Jim Henson is best known as the creator of The Muppets, though he has also received attention for projects like Fraggle Rock, The Dark Crystal, and Labyrinth. Known for his pioneering work in puppetry, Henson not only performed on his projects, but he also created advanced puppets to achieve the work he wanted to do, and was posthumously awarded the Disney Legends Award in 2011 for the incredible amount of work he did.

Jim Henson was born September 24, 1936 in Greenville, Mississippi, though he would be raised in Maryland.  He would later recall the arrival of the family’s first television as “the biggest event of his adolescence.” In 1954, while attending Northwestern High School, he began working for WTOP-TV, creating puppets for a Saturday morning children’s show called The Junior Morning Show.  Upon graduating high school, Henson enrolled at the University of Maryland at College Park to pursue studies in Studio Art. A puppetry class introduced him to the crafts and textiles courses offered in the College of Home Economics, and Henson graduated in 1960 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics. When he was a freshman, Henson was asked to create a five-minute puppet show for WRC-TV, which was called Sam and Friends; the characters would be the early development of what would become the Muppets, including an early prototype of Kermit the Frog.

In his work at WRC he began experimenting with techniques that would change the way puppetry was used on television, including using the frame defined by the camera shot to allow the puppeteer to work from off-camera. Henson also developed puppets with new materials, such as foam rubber covered in fabric, to make them more emotive and used rods to move his puppets’ limbs instead of strings, which allowed greater control. In spite of the success of Sam and Friends, Henson spent much of the 1960s and 1970s working in commercials, talk shows, and children’s projects before being able to create his dream of the Muppets as “entertainment for everybody.” Henson made appearances on many shows, including The Ed Sullivan Show, and his Muppet creations appeared in commercials and other programs. In 1963, Henson and his wife moved to New York City to develop Muppets Inc. After his wife had to quit working to raise children, Henson hired writer Jerry Juhl and puppeteer Frank Oz to replace her; he credited both writers with helping to develop the trademark humor and character of his Muppets.

In 1969, Joan Ganz Cooney and the team at the Children’s Television Workshop approached Henson to work on Sesame Street, a visionary children’s program for public television, which included a portion of the show set aside for a set of colorful and funny puppets living on the street. At first, Henson’s characters appeared separately from the realistic segments on the Street, but after a test-screening, the show was revamped to integrate the two components, placing a higher emphasis on Henson’s work. In addition to creating the characters, Henson was involved in producing various shows and animation portions during the first two seasons. Concerned that Muppets Inc. was being typecast as a purveyor of children’s content only, Henson, Oz and his team captured adult audiences with a series of sketches on the first season of Saturday Night Live. In 1976  The Muppet Show began taping, with Henson as the performer for several of the characters, including Kermit the Frog, Rowlf the Dog, the Swedish Chef, and Guy Smiley.

Though he was still engaged in creating children’s television through the eighties, with shows like Fraggle Rock and the animated series Muppet Babies, Henson continued to explore darker, more mature themes with shows such as The Storyteller. He also worked on the sitcom Dinosaurs, which was to be a standard sitcom structure, with puppet characters instead of standard actors.

Jim Henson won an award from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts for his work on The Storyteller, and was nominated in previous years for The Muppet Show in the category of Best Light Entertainment Programme. In 1978 The Muppet Show won in the category of Most Original Programme. Henson won the Daytime Emmy for The Muppet Show, Sesame Street, and his program Muppet Babies won four years consecutively.

Anyone can make a TV show, movie or webisode concept presentation package with New Show Studios.  You do not need special credentials, background or a college degree to pursue an idea.  As long as you have a clear idea of what your basic idea is and you are able to verbalize this, New Show Studios is happy to help.

New Show Studios can help you take action and pursue your TV show, movie or webisode idea.  The company has a unique method of creating show concept packages that give network and movie studio executives a professional quality view of your idea.  They can take your idea, develop and package it into a demonstration video and send it off to producers and executives in the entertainment industry.

Remember that even with the best presentation materials new entertainment development is high risk and there is very little likelihood that your idea will be successfully licensed or result in profit to you.

How to Write a Screenplay like John Hughes

Do you have an idea that you think would make a great movie, TV show or webisode, but have no idea how to write a screenplay?  It is not uncommon for people to have a screenplay idea, but have no clue where to start.

Like many other skills in life, learning to write a solid screenplay takes a good amount of research, practice and repetition. The following are some things that you can do to help yourself learn:

  • Read screenplays
  • Understand the format of a screenplay
  • Watch television shows and movies
  • Study some of the most successful screenplay writers
  • Come up with an idea for a screenplay
  • Develop screenplay ideas through outlines and storyboards

John Hughes directed or scripted some of the most successful films of the 1980s and 1990s. Born February 18, 1950, Hughes has been called the king of teen movies; he launched the acting careers of Michael Keaton, Bill Paxton, Matthew Broderick and Molly Ringwald among others, along with the group of up-and-coming actors called “The Brat Pack.”

Hughes was born in Lansing, Michigan, though his family later moved to Northbrook Illinois, where the Glenbrook North High School would provide the inspiration for the films that would make his reputation.  He described himself as “kind of quiet” as a kid, and commenting on his early childhood, he said, “I grew up in a neighborhood that was mostly girls and old people. There weren’t any boys my age, so I spent a lot of time by myself, imagining things. And every time we would get established somewhere, we would move. Life just started to get good in seventh grade, and then we moved to Chicago. I ended up in a really big high school, and I didn’t know anybody. But then The Beatles came along (and) changed my whole life. And then Bob Dylan’s Bringing It All Back Home came out and really changed me. Thursday I was one person, and Friday I was another. My heroes were Dylan, John Lennon and Picasso, because they each moved their particular medium forward, and when they got to the point where they were comfortable, they always moved on.”

He went to but ultimately dropped out of Arizona State University, afterward making money by selling jokes to established comedians like Rodney Dangerfield. As his reputation developed, he was able to get an entry level job as an advertising copywriter, creating what would become the famous Edge “Credit Card Shaving Test” ad campaign. He wrote his first credited screenplay, Class Reunion, while working at the National Lampoon magazine; the film was distinguished as the second disastrous attempt to duplicate the success of the wildly popular Animal House. His next screenplay, National Lampoon’s Vacation in 1983, was the film that finally re-established the flagship’s credibility in film.

Hughes made his directorial debut with the film Sixteen Candles in 1984, followed by The Breakfast Club, Pretty in Pink, Weird Science, and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.  After a string of successful teen movies, Hughes attempted to move out of the “teen” pigeonhole with Planes, Trains, and Automobiles in 1987. Hughes’ greatest commercial success was with Home Alone, which was the top grossing film of 1990 and is to date the most successful live-action comedy of all time. The last film that he directed was Curly Sue in 1991. While Hughes stopped directing, he continued writing almost until his passing in 2009, accumulating 34 screenplay credits, with the last one, Drillbit Taylor, written under a pseudonym and released in 2008.

Hughes’ films were characterized by their emphasis on pop songs and music cues, as well as by frequent use of filmic devices like non-linear montages, or scenes in which characters break the fourth wall. He is also known for using a freeze-frame as the closing shot. The majority of Hughes’ films were set in the North Shore suburbs of the Chicago metropolitan area. The dialogue in Hughes’ screenplays is accessible, while often tackling complex issues such as abuse, poverty, and mental illness. The spirit of lighthearted fun was incorporated in Hughes’ work, even when the themes included darker aspects of life.

While John Hughes did not win many awards in the course of his career, only the ShoWest Award in 1991 for Home Alone, he did have a great deal of critical and commercial success. Those of his movies that were not massively popular have become cult classics, for example his later films for National Lampoon and 1993’s Dennis the Menace.

New Show Studios is a company designed specifically for everyday people with ideas for screens big and small (TV shows, movies, webisodes).  The company has all the resources under one roof to develop your screenplay idea into a concept package and present it to an entertainment company through its exclusive licensing agent, SFM Entertainment.  SFM Entertainment has over 40 years of experience in the entertainment industry. 

Don’t be the person kicking yourself because you sat on your idea only to see it in theaters or on television one day, because someone else had a similar idea.  New Show Studios can help you take action and pursue your screenplay idea.

Remember that even with the best presentation materials new entertainment development is high risk and there is very little likelihood that your idea will be successfully licensed or result in profit to you.

If you have an idea for a new TV show, movie, or webisode, click here to submit your idea.

Films that Won the 2013 Oscars-Amour

Every year, the Academy Awards (known as the Oscars) honors the best films of the previous year. The 2013 Oscars, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, were held at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, California. The nominees were announced On January 10, 2013 by Seth MacFarlane and Emma Stone, at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California. The ceremony took place on February 24, 2013 and honored several new talents as well as many established artists and workers in the industry. Among the categories the Academy awards every year, the Best Picture, as well as the Best Screenplays, both Original and Adapted. There is also a category for the best Foreign Language Film, providing the Academy with the opportunity to recognize international talent.

In the category of Best Foreign Language Film, the winner was the French language production Amour. The narrative focuses on an elderly married couple, Georges and Anne, who are both retired teachers. At the beginning of the film, a brigade of firemen break down the door of an apartment in Paris to find Anne lying dead, adorned with cut flowers. Several months earlier, Anne and Georges attend a performance by one of Anne’s former pupils. The next morning while they eat breakfast, Anne suffers a stroke; sitting in a catatonic state, she is unable to respond, only coming around just as Georges is about to get help. Georges thinks that Anne was playing a prank on him, but she is unable to pour herself a drink. The surgery she undergoes to correct a blocked artery goes wrong, leaving her paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair. Distraught, she makes Georges promise not to send her back to the hospital or into a nursing home. She later has another stroke and becomes even more incapacitated, incapable of coherent speech and with her personality changed. Georges begins employing a nurse, and the strain in their relationship increases gradually, in spite of Georges’ love. One day, he sits next to Anne’s bedside and tells a story of his childhood, before smothering her with a pillow. He returns home with bundles of flowers in his hands, which he proceeds to wash and cut; he then picks out a dress and writes a long letter, explaining that he has “released the pigeon.” He imagines that Anne is washing dishes in the kitchen and, speechless, he watches her clean up and prepare to leave. Anne calls for Georges to bring a coat, and he complies, following her through the door. The film concludes with a continuation of the opening scene, with the couples’ daughter, Eva, seated in the living room after wandering around the now-empty house.

The film has received almost universal acclaim. In addition to winning the Foreign Language Film category, Amour was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Original Screenplay, Best Picture, and Best Actress, among other nominations. It also received the prestigious Palme d’Or award at the Cannes Film Festival where it debuted.

If you have a screenplay idea that you think would make a good movie or TV show, New Show Studios can help. Don’t find yourself living in regret that you never pursued the film or TV idea you have; New Show Studios has all the resources that it takes to help real people develop a screenplay idea into a concept package and present it to entertainment companies. New Show Studios works through its licensing agent, SFM Entertainment, a company with over 40 years of experience in the entertainment industry.

Successful Reality Show Ideas- I Love New York

There is a wide variety of different types of reality television shows out there.  There are dating shows, makeover shows, home remodeling shows, ones that follow the lives of celebrities and more.  But one thing that every popular reality TV show has in common is that they all began as just an idea.

I Love New York is a spinoff series based on Flavor of Love star Tiffany Pollard, better known as “New York,” in her quest to find love. The series opened with New York discussing her experiences on the show Flavor of Love, and introduced Chamo as her personal stylist and assistant. Unlike the show’s predecessor, New York allowed the contestants to give themselves names with her final approval. Each episode featured a challenge, with the prize being a group or individual date with New York. Many episodes also featured additional events, such as a barbecue given by the contestants, to attempt to get chances to impress New York. When there were only four contestants left, each got a chance to take New York on a date. The three remaining contestants then had their mothers meet New York and New York’s mother. In the finale of the show, the final two travel with New York to a resort, where they each have a final opportunity to make their case for New York’s love. The seasons also featured Reunion shows, where the cast members met to discuss issues that arose from the series. The show in its own turn spawned several spinoffs, including I Love Money, a co-ed competition series that featured contestants from I Love New York as well as other similar romance-oriented programs on VH1. New York would go on to feature on New York Goes to Hollywood as well as New York Goes to Work.

The show was created by Cris Abrego and Mark Cronin. Abrego was raised in El Monte, California and graduated from California State University, joining the Bunim/Murray Production Company. In 2002, he created a production company called Brass Ring, which created programs including Next Action Star and The Hitchhiker Chronicles. Mark Cronin graduated from Upper Darby High School and went on to earn a degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania; he spent five years working as an engineer in research and marketing while moonlighting as a freelance joke writer for Global Village News, a Nick at Nite spoof of news programming. He joined The Howard Stern Show in 1991, scripting episodes and producing interviews. He moved to Los Angeles in 1995 to become the head writer for the MTV dating show Singled Out before joining the Fox network in 1996. He founded Mindless Entertainment in 1997; he would merge the company with Abrego’s 51 Pictures to form 51 Minds Entertainment. The production company would go on to produce most of the “celebreality” programming that VH1 specialized in in the 2000s.

In July 2006, VH1 published a casting call looking for contestants for their new series tentatively called The Flavorette. On November 3, 2006, VH1 announced the show’s official title, with the first commercial for the series airing December 3, 2006 and the first episode showing in January of 2007.

If you have a reality show idea of your own, New Show Studios can help you take action and pursue it.  The company has a unique method of creating show concept packages that give network and movie studio executives a professional quality view of your idea.  They can take your reality show idea, develop and package it into a demonstration video and send it off to producers and executives in the entertainment industry.

Anyone can make a reality TV show concept presentation package with New Show Studios.  You do not need special credentials, background or a college degree to pursue an idea.  As long as you have a clear idea of what your basic idea is and you are able to verbalize this, New Show Studios is happy to help.

Remember that even with the best presentation materials new entertainment development is high risk and there is very little likelihood that your idea will be successfully licensed or result in profit to you.

 

Successful Reality Show Ideas- Sister Wives

There is a wide variety of different types of reality television shows out there.  There are dating shows, makeover shows, home remodeling shows, ones that follow the lives of celebrities and more.  But one thing that every popular reality TV show has in common is that they all began as just an idea.

Sister Wives is about a polygamist family from Utah, including patriarch Kody Brown, his four wives and their 17 children. Kody’s wives are Meri, Janelle, Christine and Robyn; Kody’s courtship of and marriage to Robyn were chronicled in the first season. The show follows the wives, children and Kody in their day-to-day lives, chronicling the difficulties of living together as a plural family; the intermittent jealousy, the compromises and conflicts, and the complex interpersonal relationships. Three of the four wives were raised in polygamist family, but Janelle was not—however, her mother entered into a polygamist marriage with Kody’s father before Janelle married Kody. Kody is father to 14 of the 17 children; Robyn had been previously married, and brought into the new marriage 3 children from her previous relationship. The Brown family has been the subject of criticism as well as litigation; the day after the premiere of the show, police in the family’s hometown of Lehi, Utah began investigating Kody Brown and his wives for possible charges of bigamy. In spite of the fact that Kody is only married to his first wife legally, the bigamy laws in Utah identify bigamy through cohabitation, not only through legal contract. The charges against the Browns were eventually dropped, however due to the publicity that the family received on the television show, Meri lost her job in the mental health industry and Kody has stated that his advertising sales suffered somewhat.

It was created by Timothy Gibbons and Christopher Poole in coordination with Bill Hayes, the president of Figure 8 Films. Bill Hayes is a graduate of Duke University and has served as a lecturer at Duke as well as acting as an adjunct professor at the University Of North Carolina School Of Journalism. In addition to Sister Wives, Hayes has acted as the Executive Producer for over 500 programs, including 19 Kids and Counting and Jon & Kate Plus 8. He has worked as a producer/director for over 25 years. Figure 8 Films is based out of North Carolina, and has been in business since approximately 2006, producing educational and informational television programming.

In autumn 2009, Timothy Gibbons and Christopher Poole approached Bill Hayes with the concept of a reality series about the Brown family. Camera crews shot footage of the family in mid-2010 to be used as a first season, ending with the marriage of Kody Brown and Robyn Sullivan. The crews continued to film afterward, to ensure material if the series was picked up for a second season. The show was introduced at the Television Critics Association summer media tour, and the first episode, an hour long, aired on September 26, 2010. At the time, polygamy and plural marriage were hot topics in popular culture, with the series Big Love on the air for several years, and more scripted shows like it running. The show has run for 4 seasons, with no indication from the broadcast company TLC of any intention of canceling.

If you have a reality show idea of your own, New Show Studios can help you take action and pursue it.  The company has a unique method of creating show concept packages that give network and movie studio executives a professional quality view of your idea.  They can take your reality show idea, develop and package it into a demonstration video and send it off to producers and executives in the entertainment industry.

Anyone can make a reality TV show concept presentation package with New Show Studios.  You do not need special credentials, background or a college degree to pursue an idea.  As long as you have a clear idea of what your basic idea is and you are able to verbalize this, New Show Studios is happy to help.

Remember that even with the best presentation materials new entertainment development is high risk and there is very little likelihood that your idea will be successfully licensed or result in profit to you.